Live Review: Rejjie Snow sends chills throughout Jack Rabbit Slim's

Live Review: Rejjie Snow sends chills throughout Jack Rabbit Slim's

Chasing away the winter blues on a rainy Saturday was none other than Rejjie Snow. With all the hype, you’d be easily forgiven for thinking such musical genius originates from the famed west coast.

However, the Dublin-born artist and producer (AKA Alexander Anyaegbunam) has unapologetically showcased himself and his craft since his debut. The man himself was here in Perth for the final show of his tour to unleash the magic of his new album, Dear Annie. The 61-minute record features special guests such as Aminé and Dana Williams lending their vocals — making for some serious collaborations that are a match made in heaven.

It was almost as if the zany release of the music video for ‘Charlie Brown’ days before was a prelude for all the crazy fun to come. After a short delay and fitting 'Say My Name’ remix, Rejjie Snow stepped onto stage with a full house chanting his name.

No one could have prepared themselves for the generous emotion and groove that Rejjie Snow was about to impart. Rejjie Snow painted a fantastical scene with ‘Rainbows’ and kept things flavourful with 'Pink Lemonade’ to follow. With smooth wordplay and some lush old school RnB, popular tracks like 'Egyptian Luvr' were a true standout. It wasn't hard to tell with all the bursts of excitement and energy from the crowd. 

In fact, you don't need to be a long-time listener to know that Rejjie Snow and Dana Williams is a pairing that blends together without question. Teaming up with Williams again in 'Room 27', Rejjie Snow took the chance to reflect on more sombre themes laced throughout the record. The album is so multi-dimensional that the charming French influences in 'LMFAO' and 'Désolé' effortlessly picked up the pace of the show straight after, while still leaving room for more high-energy songs. Think 'Greatness' in all its glory. It was absolutely perfect.

Despite all the fun had, there was no sugarcoating it; the show was bound to end at some point. Yet, as the set drew on, the audience became more and more intoxicated — in the best kind of way. The sea of phones died down as souls surrendered themselves to simply enjoy the music. It was a beautiful ride, with the young rapper whipping out some funky glasses before taking us back to the nostalgia of ‘1992’. 

Feeling the overwhelming love, Rejjie bid us adieu — and his presence was all we could've asked for.

Rated: 5/5 

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