LIVE REVIEW: Slum Sociable @ Jack Rabbit Slim's

LIVE REVIEW: Slum Sociable @ Jack Rabbit Slim's

Since releasing their lo fo lovechild 'Anyway' into the world, Slum Sociable have burst through the Australian music scene and struck up much awe.

Playing to an intimate crowd on Friday night, Slum Sociable delivered sensational washed out anthems handpicked from their first full-length and self-titled album. First up to open their set was 'Moby Bryant', received by loyal listeners getting ready to sink their teeth right in. As someone who's listened to the duo since their emergence (and wept when I couldn't make it to their gig at The Odd Fellow two years ago), it was a freeing moment to have finally heard Miller Upchurch take to the mic.

With brooding undercurrents laced in each verse, Slum Sociable had us drifting off to a celestial place of both groove and solid introspection. The album comes as a true show of strength, having been the band's ongoing project whilst one half spent months dealing with depression. No creative talent was sacrificed, for the record was a result of the pair working harmoniously together, both as long-time friends and remarkable music makers. The two, having known each other since university, have long been each other's supports — and this was reflected in both their record and performance. With Upchurch's unworldly vocals and tambourine in hand, and a guitar in Edward Quinn's, their immersive jazz hop melodies were both powerful and pensive as they filled the entire room. 

Sweeping the half-drunken audience off their feet, Slum Sociable's live presence was nothing less than wonderful. Next was 'Outrunner', which sent everyone soaring and dancing . Enter '14 Days', a hit from the duo's recently released album, and 'Castle', which made headlines upon their return this year, and you'll see enthusiasm oozing throughout the room.

Exceedingly, the two have perfected the binary of poignancy and rhythm. Although a longing, wistful tone doesn't typically suit those seeking to dance, the pair's music is so thoughtfully produced that it had them executing their set without fail. Melancholic tracks like 'A Hearing' and 'Don't Come Back Another 100 Times' were never questioned, nor contested. They were simply enjoyed for what they were: heartfelt creations.

Spoiling their fans even more, the pair pulled out a colossal surprise that they had mentioned they'd prepared for the tour. Out came a joyous and uplifting cover of Toploader's 'Dancing in the Moonlight', which had everyone shimmering and shouting with delight. (This girl was no exception.) It was a phenomenal addition to Slum Sociable's perfect set — and after gifting all with 'Name Call' and crowd favourite 'All Night', they only left the audience wanting more.

Rated: 5/5 spirit fingers

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